Join the movement to protect cats

Sign up for our mailing list and learn how you can help us win the battle against unnecessary killing of cats. Sign up now »

Drop Trap Options

Drop traps are useful tools when conducting Trap-Neuter-Return or rescuing sick or injured cats by allowing you to selectively trap a specific member of a colony, since you determine when to spring the manually operated trap. It’s also helpful for trapping shy or savvy cats who have caught on to the ins and outs of the humane box trap. Find drop trap DIY instructions and purchasing options below.

Do you have a drop trap product or design? Share it with us!

HubCats Wood Drop Trap
View the instructions

Advantages: DIY! Inexpensive, larger, and made of durable and weather resistant materials.

Possible Drawbacks: Not collapsible, so it can be difficult to transport and store. May be too light for big, strong cats.

Thanks to HubCats

Ashot’s Drop Traps
View pictures and purchasing options

Advantages: Purchase available. Lightweight to carry, collapsible.

Possible Drawbacks: Metal traps can make a lot of noise when they hit the ground which may spook cats. No "give" if cats start jumping around which may increase potential for injury. May be light enough for cats to move.

Thanks to Ashot’s Drop Traps

Tomahawk TNR Drop Trap
Purchasing and more information.

Advantages: Purchasing available. Collapsible, lightweight to carry but sturdy when constructed, transfer door.

Possible Drawbacks: Metal traps can make a lot of noise when they hit the ground which may spook cats. No "give" if cats start jumping around which may increase potential for injury. May be light enough for cats to move. Thin propping mechanism.

Thanks to Tomahawk Live Traps

PVC Drop Trap
View the instructions

Advantages: DIY! Collapsible design. Solid sides which may help cats remain calm. Netted top proves “give” to help keep cats safe.

Possible Drawbacks: Netting may rip, so make sure the kind you use is good quality. This design requires a variety of hardware. The instructions are fairly complex, but well documented.

Thanks to Lisa A. Pierson, DVM