Tag Archive: spay/neuter

  1. New York Senate Fails to Act on TNR Funding Bills

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    The New York State Senate adjourned for the summer without taking up AB 9487/SB 7290. This means that the New York state spay/neuter fund will not yet be authorized to fund Trap-Neuter-Return.

    Thank you to everyone who contacted their State Assemblymember and Senator about this bill. Because of you, the State Assembly did take the important step to pass the bill. Unfortunately, the Senate did not act in time to do the same.

    Even though these bills failed to pass this legislative session, we are optimistic for the future and will stay engaged in this issue and let you know how you can help.

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  2. UPDATE: New York Legislation to Expand TNR Moves On to the Senate

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    Good news! On June 9, the New York State Assembly voted to approve A.9487! The bill now passes to the Senate, where it is now before the Senate Agriculture Committee. Now the bill must pass the Senate before it becomes a law.

    AB 9487 and SB 7290, would expand the reach of the state spay/neuter fund to include Trap-Neuter-Return efforts. Community (feral) cats have a critical need for spay and neuter services, but currently, New York’s spay/neuter fund is not authorized to support TNR projects.

    Studies show that only a small percentage of community cats are sterilized compared to pet cats, so expanding the reach of the spay/neuter fund will allow it to have a greater impact without increasing cost. When impounded in shelters, community cats are nearly always killed. These bills would save cats lives by controlling the population humanely, through spaying and neutering.

    New York Residents: Ask your State Senator to support community cats!
    Time is running out before the Senate adjourns for the summer. Respectfully contact your State Senator today!

    Not in New York? Learn how to build Trap-Neuter-Return capacity in your community.

  3. Maryland Accepting Applications for Spay/Neuter Grants

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    The Maryland state legislature has created a fund that will award up to $1 million in grants each year to spay or neuter dogs and cats. If you’re part of an organization that spays and neuters cats, you could receive a grant from Maryland to help further your work. Feral cats are explicitly included, allowing organizations to expand TNR efforts.

    Thanks to everyone who contacted their representative in favor of a statewide spay/neuter bill this past spring. This exciting initiative will help save the lives of Maryland cats through supporting spay/neuter efforts including Trap-Neuter-Return!

    The application period has begun, and the deadline to apply is 5:00 p.m. on August 6, 2014. Apply now!

    Learn more about Maryland’s Spay and Neuter Grants Program.

  4. In Your Backyard

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    Improving the Lives of Charm City’s Kitties

    In three days, 115 cats were spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and eartipped.

    In three days, 115 cats were spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and
    eartipped in Baltimore.

    In early February, Alley Cat Allies participated in a targeted Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) project carried out by Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS), Caring Hands Animal Support and Education (CHASE), and Best Friends Animal Society. Alley Cat Allies staff led two workshops to educate community members about TNR. Our staff and volunteers also helped humanely trap cats, make sure they were comfortable during recovery, and return them to their outdoor homes after they recovered (the best part of TNR!). Alley Cat Allies was part of a local coalition that worked to build citywide support for TNR in Baltimore, which adopted one of the country’s best TNR ordinances in 2007.

    A Small State with Big Plans for Cats

    Delaware may be the nation’s second smallest state, but it has a long list of cities that support Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR). That list grew even longer this January when Alley Cat Allies helped Delaware City, Del. draft and adopt a TNR ordinance. Delaware City joins neighboring Rehoboth Beach, Harrington, Milford, and Dewey Beach in supporting this humane, highly successful program for feral cats.

    A Big Win for Cats

    Because of your support, a plan to end a long-standing Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) program at Bayside State Prison in Leesburg, N.J. has been averted.

    With your help, we kicked off a campaign that helped save Bayside’s cats—and saved its nine-year-old TNR program. The prison’s administrators cancelled trapping plans and invited Alley Cat Allies and local rescue groups to assess the situation. When touring the property, we had the chance to see some of the beautiful, healthy cats. This March, we returned to the prison to help with TNR. Thanks to you, the cats are safe and cared for in their outdoor home.

  5. New York Residents: Support Legislation to Expand TNR!

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    Some good news could be on the horizon for community cats in New York. A pair of bills, AB 9487 and SB 7290, would expand the reach of the state spay/neuter fund to include Trap-Neuter-Return efforts.

    Community cats have a critical need for spay and neuter services, but currently, New York’s spay/neuter fund is not authorized to support TNR projects. Studies show that only a small percentage of feral cats are sterilized compared to pet cats, so expanding the reach of the spay/neuter fund will allow it to have a greater impact without increasing cost.

    When impounded in shelters, community cats are nearly always killed. These bills would save the lives of cats by controlling the population humanely, through neutering.

    New York Residents: Take Action!
    Not in New York? Learn how to build Trap-Neuter-Return capacity in your community.

  6. No Vote on Alabama Spay/Neuter Bill

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    The Alabama Senate adjourned yesterday without voting on HB 141, the Spay/Neuter Protection Act. This means that even though the bill successfully passed the Alabama House of Representatives and a Senate committee, it will not become law this year.

    Alley Cat Allies will stay actively involved and continue to push for this and other humane policies in Alabama. We’ll keep you updated on how you can continue to support spay/neuter resources in Alabama.

  7. When to Spay? Early!

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    Kittens can be safely spayed or neutered at eight weeks, or as soon as they weigh two pounds (and are healthy). The Humane Alliance’s When to Spay Campaign educates pet owners on when they should get their pet spayed/neutered. Featuring videos and a social media campaign, When to Spay provides the facts and stats on early-age spay/neuter in a fun format. The When to Spay crew even organized a flash mob in Asheville, N.C. (yes, there’s a video)!

    The When to Spay site features testimonials from veterinarians who support early-age spay/neuter and Vet Corner blog posts from Boyd Harrell, DVM on the health benefits of early-age spay/neuter.

    “Early age surgery is safe with fewer post-surgery concerns, is less stressful on the patient, provides a quicker recover time, and is generally less expensive than later age spay/neuter,” says Dr. Harrell.

    Here are just a few of the benefits of early-age spay/neuter:

    • It’s an easier, faster procedure.
    • Patients recover more quickly.
    • Patients have fewer complications.
    • It provides the highest level of prevention of litters.
    • It produces the most prevention per dollar invested.

    When to Spay is a great resource to share with veterinary professionals—and anyone else—who is not yet convinced that early-age spay/neuter is the way to go.

    Check out the When to Spay campaign here.
    Read more about the benefits of and techniques for early-age spay/neuter on Alley Cat Allies’ website.

  8. Alley Cat Allies Helps with TNR at Bayside Prison

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    tuxedocat_newssiteAlley Cat Allies staff joined local groups in New Jersey to carry out Trap-Neuter-Return at Bayside State Prison on March 12. Late last year, thanks to dedicated local organizations and activists, we were able to help save a colony of feral cats living at this Leesburg, N.J. prison and protect the prison’s long-standing TNR program.

    Low-risk inmates and prison guards humanely trapped cats living on the property. One guard who cares for a colony of cats near where she is stationed successfully trapped all seven cats in her colony!

    Alley Cat Allies’ Atlantic City Program Manager Kim Kean and Direct Care Associate Pam Ward helped transport the cats from different locations on the prison property to the clinic, which was run by run by Animal Alliance of Cape May County. Alley Cat Allies staff also assisted in the clinic where a total of 15 cats were spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and eartipped. Everything went smoothly.

    We look forward to continue working with the prison to keep these cats healthy and safe!

  9. Keeping Spay/Neuter Clinic Doors Open in Alabama

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    alabama_action_sidebar**UPDATE: There is less than two weeks left for the Alabama Senate to conduct business in 2014. If the Senate is going to approve the Spay/Neuter Protection Act, it must do so soon. Take Action TODAY!**

    An Alabama bill that will protect spay/neuter clinics has now passed the state’s House of Representatives, and is poised for a full vote by Alabama’s Senate. Thank you to everyone in Alabama who took action to support this bill!

    The bill, the Veterinary Practice Act, will allow the state’s critical spay/neuter clinics to continue providing lifesaving services for cats and dogs. Alabama has four spay/neuter clinics that provide much-needed services including high-quality, low-cost spay and neuter procedures and basic wellness services like vaccinations and deworming. It’s critical that these clinics keep their doors open. The services are performed by licensed, experienced veterinarians who have the animals’ best interests in mind. Together, these clinics spay or neuter more than 10,000 cats and dogs each year.

    In the last few years, a state board has unfairly—and for no good reason—tried to shut these clinics down. The Veterinary Practice Act would make it clear that these important clinics, which often serve low-income and underserved communities, have the right to stay open.

    Alabama residents: Please contact your State Senator and respectfully ask him or her to support the Veterinary Practice Act, HB 141.

    Not in Alabama? Learn how you can protect the lives of cats in your community.

  10. Extreme Makeover: Shelter Edition

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    A Visit with Lee County Domestic Animal Services
    kitten_newssiteAs part of our Future Five: Shelter Partners to Save Cats’ Lives program, we recently visited shelter partner Lee County Domestic Animal Services (LCDAS) in Fort Myers, Fla. to check in and provide training and guidance. We found that the shelter has already made impressive strides in its “makeover” into a model shelter.

    After reviewing model shelter policies and presentations by shelter medicine expert Kate Hurley, DVM, Alley Cat Allies’ National Cat Help Desk Manager Brianna Brumbaugh trained key shelter and animal control staff on developing humane programs for cats.

    Brumbaugh trained the front desk staff on humane cat deterrents to prepare them to respond to calls and questions. During her stay, she also rode along with the shelter’s lead volunteer responding to calls about community cats and noted how great she was at explaining TNR and working with the public.

    The shelter’s director Donna Ward shared her “a-ha” moment that made her realize the shelter system needs to change. Once, she was about to return a cat to her outdoor home as part of Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR), but decided to take the cat back to the shelter and put her up for adoption because she was friendly. Ward then went out of town, and while she was gone the cat developed an upper respiratory infection and was “euthanized” (i.e. killed). The moral of the story: TNR would have been the better outcome. That’s what the Future Five program is all about: shelters creating positive outcomes for cats.

    The shelter has already made some major changes. LCDAS now performs early-age spay/neuter and will be adopting out cats who test positive for FELV or FIV.

    Learn more about the other Future Five Shelter Partners’ transformations.